The Japanese show Egyptians how to tackle littering

The Japanese show Egyptians how to tackle littering – Egyptian Streets

A few days ago, Japan faced Ivory Coast in their first 2014 World Cup game. After leading with a single goal for nearly 65 minutes, Japan conceded two quick goals and were unable to comeback from behind, eventually losing the game with two goals to one. As the referee blew his whistle and signaled the end of the match, the fans picked up garbage bags and started cleaning up after their own mess in an act of respect towards the hosting country and their own culture.

How many of us in Egypt or elsewhere would bother to behave in a similar matter when experiencing a similar situation?

Despite their sadness and disappointment at losing the game, the Japanese chose to clean up the mess they’ve created and make the lives of several people a bit easier. They felt responsible and obligated to face the consequences of their actions.

On the other hand, we Egyptians often use anger and disappointment as excuses for our inefficiencies, but the thing is, our emotions should not interfere with our duties when it comes to society. We owe it to ourselves and our country to treat our land the way it deserves to be treated.

What the Japanese did, as simple as it may be, sent out a message to the world. Wouldn’t it be easier if each and every one of us spared a few minutes to ensure we’re leaving the place we’re at as clean as it was on our arrival? Why don’t we implement their actions into our own daily lives?

The Egyptian government recently issued a new law that toughens fines related to littering and the dumping of garbage, but the question is why did we reach a point where we need such laws to prevent us from harming our own environment? As far as my knowledge goes, I believe that no such laws exists for littering football stands, but that didn’t stop the Japanese from doing what they believed was right.

There’s always this one person who lowers his car window and throws out a cigarette, tissue, plastic bottle and more. What makes such actions even more depressing is that there are often younger minds accompanying such men and women. So what message are you sending to Egypt’s future generation? Is it socially acceptable to treat your country as a giant trash bin? Is that the mentality you would like others to adopt in order to justify your own actions?

What keeps on holding Egyptians back and what forced the government to issue such laws is the common belief that one will not or cannot make a difference.

So I ask you: don’t be discouraged by those around you, but rather try to guide them, because if we Egyptians strive towards a better life, Egypt will automatically turn into a much more decent place to live in regardless of the ruler.

Our President’s job description does not include cleaning up after his own people. It ultimately comes to whether you want to live in a healthier environment or not. It comes down to your attitude and mentality. Do you still have hope for a better Egypt, or have you given up already?

The Japanese fans’ behavior did not only inspire many to do the same, but also showed how civilized they are. Their discipline and social ethics are now an example to the world and there is no shame in following in their footsteps if we aim to progress as a society.

Remember the “cleanup week” following the 25th of January revolution when many spent their days picking up garbage and cleaning streets believing they can influence positive change? How about we do it once again, but perhaps for a bit longer than a week? Perhaps, you know, like, forever?

And remember, each time you ignore your social responsibilities towards your people and act in such an uncivilized manner, you are blocking the path that leads to the Egypt we dream of.

Why Egyptians who boycott the elections are not ‘traitors’

Why Egyptians who boycott the elections are not ‘traitors’ – Egyptian Streets

Many have been falsely accusing others of negativity illogically and unreasonably with zero knowledge of why some have decided to boycott the elections. I believe boycotting is the correct decision and have decided to support them, so before you start calling me سلبي (passive), read what I have to say.

I am not boycotting because I no longer care about Egypt’s future or because I am convinced that nothing will change, but rather because it contradicts my principles.

We have been presented with two candidates and I believe that none of them is capable or worthy of ruling Egypt. I have a responsibility when it comes to elections – and it doesn’t revolve around sheer participation.

The man I vote for may become Egypt’s president for the next four years, and if I have the slightest of doubts regarding his ability to manage the country and yet vote for him, I’ll be one of those to blame if the day comes and he fails. Neither of these men, in my opinion, can help Egypt take a step forward for the first time since the 25th of January revolution. I refuse to be forced into a situation where I must choose “the least harmful option.”

“Spoiling the vote would be if we approved the elections but the candidates are not up to our expectations and we don’t agree with the process.” – Ahmed Imam, official spokesman for “Strong Egypt” Party.

Egyptians have voted ‘yes’ for the new constitution a few months ago, although many criticized the increased power it gives to our military. <any chose to overlook these controversial articles for the sake of “progress” and because the new constitution was “overall good.”

But why didn’t we call for amendments? Our low expectations are keeping us where we are, preventing us from building the new and improved country we’ve been dreaming of for years.

We have stopped our pursuit for freedom in exchange for safety – and that should not be the case. Instead of compromising a right for another, we should be looking for a man who will prioritize our demands and serve to provide both rights, not give up one for another.

THE LAST TIME WE RUSHED TO ELECT A CANDIDATE

The last time Egyptians decided to rush into electing a president, we ended up with Mohamed Morsi, and the rest is history. We’ve wasted a year of our lives under the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood because we “needed” a president back then. We are repeating the same mistake once again. Some voted for Morsi just because he wasn’t felool, and this trade-off resulted in us witnessing unrest over the following year.

This isn’t a governmental position that provides us with the time and luxury to experiment in and try out someone who may turn out to be a decent leader. No, it isn’t worth the risk especially when the lives of others depend on it. Nor is it worth the risk of electing an unfit candidate and granting him these powers, knowing that there is a great chance he may fail and only make things worse.

No one has so far managed to convince me of the difference between boycotting and invalidating votes, because both have the same effect. If we really wanted to make use of invalid votes and send a message through them, we should have created a rule where the winner must surpass both the candidates and invalid votes in terms of percentages, forcing us to repeat the presidential elections once more until a suitable candidate is found and agreed upon. But that rule does not exist.

My decision to boycott does not convey by any means signs of negativity simply because I know what I have to do when either of them wins. I know what is expected of me as an Egyptian. So even though I have my differences with both candidates as when it comes to the man’s ethics or his capability of rescuing a country like ours, I do know one thing: if either of them, after winning, manages to prove me wrong and presents me ideas, projects, and opportunities that will help lead us all towards the right path, I will support him.

I will not criticize either of them for the sake of criticizing like many did with Morsi. For as long as they are trying to help, I will not stand in the way. And that is what it should come down to in the end. For if we truly care about our country and aim to be on top of the world once again, the winner of these presidential elections should not alter our thoughts or plans. Everything we do should be to improve other’s lives and help those struggling get back on their feet, not to discredit either candidate.

Our goal is not to help a candidate succeed. Our goal is to help Egypt rise.

WHAT REALLY MATTERS IN THE END

It no longer matters if you choose to boycott, vote for El-Sisi, vote for Hamdeen, or invalidate your vote, because it is your attitude following the results that matters. Most of us agree that Morsi had to go and that he was only worsening our situation, and I strongly agree with this, but how many of us actually tried to help during his reign? How many of us were open to working hard back then?

That is why Sabahi and Al-Sisi have been stressing how important it is for all of us to collaborate. A president without support will surely fail no matter who he is, and that is why we need to modify our mentality before a new era starts. We need to put aside our political differences and build together, because our imaginary super-president that can remodel Egypt on his own does not exist.

We can already predict the winner and it has been clear for a while now, and I don’t like it. But true negativity comes from blocking progress, even if I have been provided with a chance to help, not from boycotting elections that feature two unfit candidates.

True negativity comes from ignoring the call of duty when you are most needed. The new president will demand hard work and commitment so we can move forward. So, despite the fact that I may not support the winner politically, I am required to put my opinion of him aside and act professionally.

Before you blame and criticize others for their decisions, talk to them and give them a chance to explain their choices. Ask them why they’re refusing to choose one candidate over the other, and stop throwing the word سلبي(passive) around.

You have the right to believe that participation is necessary, but others also have the right to choose to boycott. Isn’t that why we asked for democracy? Don’t accuse those who started it all and are the reason why you are finally able to participate in elections in the first place of negativity. Don’t accuse them of disloyalty or of being traitors, for without them there would have been no elections to start with.

Both candidates realize that failure will result in their departure, but I hope that none of us will turn out to be the one that tries to ruin their chances and attempts to help, if they exist, just because of personal political views.